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dc.contributor.advisorPiquero, Nicole L.
dc.creatorKail, Rachel M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T20:53:20Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T20:53:20Z
dc.date.created2016-12
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.date.submittedDecember 2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/5354
dc.description.abstractA great deal of research has evaluated the negative consequences of bullying victimization across traditional and online forms of bullying. However relatively little research has evaluated the potential causes for these negative interactions within the cyberbullying literature. Agnew’s (1992) General Strain Theory provides a potential theoretical explanation for these negative online interactions. The purpose of this study was to extend the GST literature to a newly developed form of delinquent behavior and evaluate strain as a potential explanation of cyberbullying perpetration among a sample of approximately 150 college students. Results revealed that increased levels of strain were associated with higher engagement in cyberbullying behavior. Further results are discussed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsCopyright ©2016 is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Eugene McDermott Library. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectCyberbullying
dc.subjectCritical criminology
dc.subjectStress (Psychology)
dc.titleWhat Influences Cyberbullying: A Test of General Strain Theory
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-03-31T20:53:20Z
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Dallas
thesis.degree.departmentCriminology
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMS


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