Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorYezhuvath, Uma S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAslan, Sinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMotes, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Jeffrey S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRypma, Barten_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Sandra Bonden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T19:30:16Z
dc.date.available2018-10-22T19:30:16Z
dc.date.created2018-10-22
dc.identifier.issn0197-4580en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/6212
dc.description.abstractHigher-order cognitive training has shown to enhance performance in older adults, but the neural mechanisms underlying performance enhancement have yet to be fully disambiguated. This randomized trial examined changes in processing speed and processing speed-related neural activity in older participants (57-71years of age) who underwent cognitive training (CT, N= 12) compared with wait-listed (WLC, N= 15) or exercise-training active (AC, N= 14) controls. The cognitive training taught cognitive control functions of strategic attention, integrative reasoning, and innovation over 12weeks. All 3 groups worked through a functional magnetic resonance imaging processing speed task during 3 sessions (baseline, mid-training, and post-training). Although all groups showed faster reaction times (RTs) across sessions, the CT group showed a significant increase, and the WLC and AC groups showed significant decreases across sessions in the association between RT and BOLD signal change within the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). Thus, cognitive training led to a change in processing speed-related neural activity where faster processing speed was associated with reduced PFC activation, fitting previously identified neural efficiency profiles.en_US
dc.description.sponsorship"This work was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (RC1-AG035954, 2009; R01-NS067015, 2010; R01- AG033106; 2009)"en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.10.003
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives)en_US
dc.rights©2017 The Authors. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectCognitive therapyen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectNeuroplasticityen_US
dc.subjectCognition--Data processingen_US
dc.subjectReasoningen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.titleHigher-Order Cognitive Training Effects on Processing Speed-Related Neural Activity: A Randomized Trialen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.type.genrearticleen_US
dc.description.departmentCenter for BrainHealthen_US
dc.description.departmentSchool of Behavioral and Brain Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMotes, Michael A., Uma S. Yezhuvath, Sina Aslan, Jeffrey S. Spence, et al. 2018. "Higher-order cognitive training effects on processing speed-related neural activity: A randomized trial." Neurobiology of Aging 62, 72-81, doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.10.003en_US
dc.source.journalNeurobiology of Agingen_US
dc.identifier.volume62en_US
dc.contributor.utdAuthorMotes, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.utdAuthorAslan, Sinaen_US
dc.contributor.utdAuthorSpence, Jeffrey S.en_US
dc.contributor.utdAuthorRypma, Barten_US
dc.contributor.utdAuthorChapman, Sandra Bonden_US
dc.contributor.ISNI0000 0003 5170 3614 (Chapman, SB)en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives)