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dc.contributor.authorSabharwal, Meghna
dc.contributor.authorLevine, Helisse
dc.contributor.authorD'Agostino, Maria
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Tiffany
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-31T22:36:12Z
dc.date.available2019-05-31T22:36:12Z
dc.date.created2018-12-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/6551
dc.description.abstractThe federal government lags behind in progressive civil rights policies in regard to universal workplace antidiscrimination laws for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans. The slow progress matters to inclusionary workplace practices and the theory and practice of public administration generally, as recognition of LGBT rights and protection are constitutive of representative bureaucracy and promoting social equity. This study examines the turnover intention rates of self-identified LGBT employees in the U.S. federal government. Using the Office of Personnel Management’s inclusion quotient (IQ), and 2015 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS), we identify links in the relationships between workplace inclusion and turnover outcomes among LGBT individuals. We also examine the impact of agency type on LGBT turnover rates based on Lowi’s agency classification type. Key findings suggest that LGBT employees express higher turnover intentions than those that identify as heterosexuals/straight, and LGBT employees who perceive their agencies as redistributive or communal are less likely to experience turnover intentions. However, an open and supportive workplace environment had a positive impact on turnover, suggesting that to implement effective structural change in an organization’s culture of inclusion, public sector managers must do more than merely “talk the talk.” This finding is also suggestive of LGBT employees’ desire to avoid the stigma of being LGBT and hide their identities. Institutions must heed the invisible and visible identities of their employees to be truly inclusive. Workplace practices that acknowledge the invisible and visible identities of their employees are a positive step toward real workplace inclusion.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0275074018817376
dc.rights©2018 The Authors
dc.subjectLesbians
dc.subjectGays
dc.subjectBisexuals
dc.subjectTransgender people
dc.subjectSocial integration
dc.subjectLabor turnover
dc.subjectUnited States—Officials and employees
dc.subjectPublic service employment
dc.titleInclusive Work Practices: Turnover Intentions Among LGBT Employees of the U.S. Federal Government
dc.type.genrearticle
dc.description.departmentSchool of Economic, Political and Policy Studies
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSabharwal, M., H. Levine, M. D'Agostino, and T. Nguyen, 2018. "Inclusive work practices: Turnover intentions among LGBT employees of the U.S. Federal government. American Review of Public Administration, doi:10.1177/0275074018817376
dc.source.journalAmerican Review of Public Administration
dc.contributor.utdAuthorSabharwal, Meghna
dc.contributor.VIAF293512785 (Sabharwal, M)
dc.contributor.ORCID0000-0003-1294-559X (Sabharwal, M)


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