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dc.contributor.authorMa, J.
dc.contributor.authorHuang, D.
dc.contributor.authorMarkovitch, D. G.
dc.contributor.authorRatchford, Brian T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-29T18:11:12Z
dc.date.available2019-07-29T18:11:12Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.identifier.issn0309-0566
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/6754
dc.descriptionFull text access from Treasures at UT Dallas is restricted to current UTD affiliates (use the provided Link to Article).
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper aims to investigate the moderating impacts of seasonality on the effectiveness of new product commercialization strategies in short-lifecycle markets. The authors contextualize their theory in the vast and culturally significant entertainment industry sector and contrast the effects between independent films and big budget movies. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses an econometric modeling approach. Findings: This study finds that unlike new films by well-resourced studios, which must launch in a high season for best performance, independents can generate more revenue in low seasons under certain conditions. The study shows how seasonality moderates the effectiveness of new films’ commercialization strategies and how new product outcomes are different for small independent products than for big-budget productions with regards to distribution duration, advertising expenditure and product characteristics. Research limitations/implications: This research extends the literature on launch timing, which examines various strategic tradeoffs. In contrast with the few extant studies whose concern is sensitizing to the effects of seasonality (Siqueiraet al., 2016), this research treats seasonality as an exploitable opportunity that can be strategically factored into business planning for small producers. Accordingly, this is the first study to theoretically and empirically investigate the moderating relationship between seasonality, marketing decisions, product characteristics and performance. Practical implications: To achieve useful specificity, the study constructs its discussion around the highly seasonal entertainment industry sector. The study shows that seasonality moderates the effectiveness of new films’ commercialization decisions and that the strategic outcomes are different for small independent products than for major studio productions in particular. Originality/value: In contrast with extant research whose concern is sensitizing to the effects of seasonality, our research treats seasonality as an exploitable opportunity that can be strategically factored into business planning. Accordingly, ours is the first study to theoretically and empirically investigate the moderating relationship between seasonality, marketing decisions, product characteristics and performance.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EJM-08-2017-0513
dc.rights©2018 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
dc.subjectMotion picture industry
dc.subjectNew products
dc.subjectSeasonality (Economics)
dc.subjectSmall business
dc.titleHigh or Low Season?: Contrasting Launch Timing Considerations for Big-Budget and Low-Budget Entertainment Products
dc.type.genrearticle
dc.description.departmentNaveen Jindal School of Management
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMa, J., D. Huang, D. G. Markovitch, and B. Ratchford. 2018. "High or low season?: Contrasting launch timing considerations for big-budget and low-budget entertainment products." European Journal of Marketing 52(9/10): 1956-1980, doi:10.1108/EJM-08-2017-0513
dc.source.journalEuropean Journal of Marketing
dc.identifier.volume52
dc.identifier.issue9/10
dc.contributor.utdAuthorRatchford, Brian T.
dc.contributor.VIAF35779481 (Ratchford, BT)


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