Examining the Effects of the Other-race Effect on Conscious and Unconscious Deception Detection Using Online Testing Methods

dc.contributor.advisorKrawczyk, Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorFilbey, Francesca
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPark, Jiyoung
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPinkham, Amy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSpence, Jeffrey
dc.creatorNguyen, Linda Thu
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-27T16:42:11Z
dc.date.available2023-03-27T16:42:11Z
dc.date.created2021-12
dc.date.issued2021-12-01T06:00:00.000Z
dc.date.submittedDecember 2021
dc.date.updated2023-03-27T16:42:12Z
dc.description.abstractEveryday, people interact with other people. Whether it is face to face or online, people interact and make judgements about the quality and veracity of those conversations. Despite this, previous research has found that people are only about 54% accurate when detecting deception – just slightly better than a coin flip. This research aims to further understand the mechanisms behind deception detection as well as the cross-cultural elements and thought processing that influences deception detection. In this study, I ran a cross-cultural research study looking at how participants evaluate the veracity of videos of people in their own and other culture lying and telling the truth. Overall, I found that Caucasian individuals were more accurate at detecting deception than East Asian individuals. In addition, I found that while Caucasian individuals did not show an own or other race bias when detecting deception, East Asian individuals were more likely to characterize those of their own race as being honest and those of the other race as being dishonest.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.uri
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/9638
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive
dc.subjectPsychology, Social
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience
dc.titleExamining the Effects of the Other-race Effect on Conscious and Unconscious Deception Detection Using Online Testing Methods
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.collegeSchool of Behavioral and Brain Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentCognition and Neuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Dallas
thesis.degree.namePHD

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