Access to High School Arts Education: Why Student Participation Matters as much as Course Availability

dc.contributor.authorThomas, M. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Priyankaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlopfenstein, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHenry, T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-25T22:09:18Z
dc.date.available2014-08-25T22:09:18Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-04en_US
dc.descriptionAbstract available in English, Spanish and Portuguese.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is renewed interest in the role of arts education in the curriculum of U.S. public schools not only because of the intrinsic value of the arts and its believed impact on achievement, but because cultivating creativity is thought to promote innovation and fuel economic growth. Still, we know little about basic access to arts education. Using individual-level administrative data from The University of Texas at Dallas Education Research Center (UTD-ERC), we develop several distinct indices of access to identify high schools rich in the arts. We find that high schools offering an extensive number of courses in the arts do not necessarily enjoy high rates of student participation. Policymakers who examine access based only on course counts in the arts will identify predominately large, non-rural high schools as having arts-rich environments. Evaluating arts programs along a single dimension, as is common in federal reports and other studies, fails to provide an accurate representation of access to arts education. Any examination of access to arts education should jointly consider course availability and student engagement in the arts. Policymakers can follow our approach and develop similar indices to assess the current state of arts education in their states.en_US
dc.description.sponsorship"This research is supported in part by a grant from the Spencer Foundation."en_US
dc.identifier.citationThomas, M. K., P. Singh, K. Klopfenstein, and T. Henry. 2013. "Access to high school arts education: Why student participation matters as much as course availability." 21(83): 1-24en_US
dc.identifier.issn1068-2341en_US
dc.identifier.issue83en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10735.1/3926
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v21n83.2013
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-SA (Attribution--Non-Commercial--Share Alike)en_US
dc.rights.holderen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.source.journalEducation Policy Analysis Archivesen_US
dc.subjectArt--Study and teachingen_US
dc.subjectMusic--Instruction and studyen_US
dc.subjectTheateren_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondaryen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.titleAccess to High School Arts Education: Why Student Participation Matters as much as Course Availabilityen_US
dc.type.genrearticleen_US

Files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
ERC-SR-PSingh-309648.49.pdf
Size:
716.34 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
Article

License bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
EPAA Open Access Policy.pdf
Size:
95.93 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:

Collections